A quick update on Land-Rover work

I haven’t been doing much work on my Land Rover recently, because of the cold weather and lack of available dry daylight hours. I’ve been doing some wiring (still in progress), but as you can see, there’s some tidying-up to do on that before I regard it as “done” for a while.

The ceiling switch panel, swung down for maintenance

The ceiling switch panel, swung down for maintenance

At least the ceiling switchpanel is reasonably modular; the backbone of it is what most needs tidying. All the wiring is documented in an org-mode file, with some purpose-written Emacs-Lisp for navigating it, so there isn’t a circuit diagram as such, but a list of connection groups, with the same name occurring at both ends of the same wire.

The back of the wiring hub

The back of the wiring hub

The wiring at the back of the central hub of the star-topology main wiring is on its second iteration, this time done with colour-coded wires (the original was all-white). The thinner wires on the left lead to some pieces of stripboard with edge-connectors on them (insulated by the thick bluish-looking tape); those will eventually connect to a board of LEDs to give me the status of almost all the wires, and also to voltage dividers feeding the GPIO pins of an Android Accessory Development Kit, a specialized version of the Arduino microcontroller that interfaces to an Android device, which I will connect to phablet that I will build into the ceiling panel.

In a classic piece of programmer’s yak-shaving, while designing the bezel to hold the phablet in place, I decided Inkscape wasn’t really my way of doing things, and started to write my own Emacs-Lisp CAD system, in which shapes can be described by easily-edited textual expressions (inspired by the pic drawing language, but improved by structuring as s-expressions). This is taking a while, but I’m sure it’ll be worth it.

Inside the dashboard

Inside the dashboard

I tidied up the gap in the dashboard, to make it easier to put the wiring hub in and out. At first, I dreaded this task, but it’s a lot easier now. Disconnecting and reconnecting it is easy; the cables that go in the top of the hub are all labelled with their positions in the 8×3 grid of sockets, and there are only four at the back (one earths, and three to the fusebox).

The new exhaust

The new exhaust

The old exhaust system, that I’d put together from two long-wheelbase Land Rover exhausts, with the help of my mechanic friend, fell apart on my way to EMF, and at last I got round to getting a custom one made, by Demand Engineering near Stowmarket. It’s very satisfactory, and the vehicle is quieter than it was, and the engine compartment doesn’t get so warm, so the old one probably had been leaking a little near the front as well as part-way back where the old end had fallen off.

By the way, the strips with holes in them, on the underside of the chassis longitudinal beams, are for bolting battery boxes to when I eventually get round to going hybrid by putting an electric motor on the third axle. The transverse tubes at the front and back of those strips are with a view to being able to slot removable crawler tracks in under the long section, so that rather than getting grounded on ridges or sliding over them, I can roll over them. Powered tracks would be even nicer, and screw drive would be really cool, but I basic tracks would be a good start.

Advertisements

Post a Comment

Required fields are marked *

*
*

%d bloggers like this: