Nearly there with the bodywork

I took yesterday as vacation from work to work on the 6-wheeler, and also worked on it today.

The end of the spare parts vehicle

The end of the spare parts vehicle

To start with, we started the final stripdown of the Land Rover I bought for spare parts. Here it is about to make its final drive into the barn for disassembly. It’s still driveable in the form seen here.

A door triangle frame, ready to add

A door triangle frame, ready to add

Someone came up with a better idea than fabricating frames for the triangular gaps left by using front doors as second row doors: use the corners of the second row door frames. I was already planning to get them TIGged in later, and to cut out the slanting part. For now, I’ve just used strips of metal with rivets to hold them in. I put the top strip of metal on the added frame first, so it would hold it in place while I rivetted it to the door.

A door triangle from the inside

A door triangle from the inside; a temporary measure

Later on, I’ll remove the slanting part and the aluminium skin, and fit a rectangular window.

Bending the wheelarch sheets

Bending the wheelarch sheets

I also cut the rear wheelarch eyebrows in half and re-fitted the pieces, and bent some perforated aluminium sheet to make the section that goes between them.

Stretching the wheelarches

Stretching the wheelarches

The perforated sheet will form the base of some GRP that I’ll lay up. The existing wheelarch eyebrows seem to be GRP (or some kind of matrix composite, anyway). The sheets are held in place with a few M4 machine screws with large washers; I hope the GRP will hold them in place too.

A small remaining gap

A small remaining gap

That just leaves some small remaining gaps to plug with aluminium sheet and bodyfiller; for example, this one behind the base of the C-pillar (which I’ve mostly covered with aluminium plate since taking this photo).

I’ll do those next time, along with starting to lay up the fibreglass for the wheelarch eyebrow extensions. After that, I’ll move on to the wiring.

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3 Comments

  1. Posted 2013/03/10 at 9:14 AM | Permalink

    Have you decided on a colour yet?

    • Posted 2013/03/11 at 11:09 AM | Permalink

      Yes, I’ve ordered some Maasai Red i.e. the normal modern Land Rover red. The vehicle was originally white, and traces of that sometimes still show up; a previous owner had painted it some obscure British Leyland red, which was hard to find; then I painted it what was supposedly Massey Ferguson red, thinking that would be an easy one to match for touch-ups, but it turned out different manufacturers had very different ideas about that one; so now I’m simply going for a standard Land Rover one.

      The dark green seems to cover up quite easily; I’ve given it a layer of cheap red spray primer just to help with that.

      The roof is staying white; once I’ve finished filling in holes where wires had gone in the past, I’ll jetwash it thoroughly to to get algae off before painting. Multiple old wires (3- and 2-core) will be replaced by a single 8-core wire on each side, with distribution from junction boxes on the roofrack, and this time they’ll have proper glands instead of rubber grommets and/or mastic.

      The interior is white, as before, but I’ve now painted some metal (galv) that was previously bare, to hide the differences between the pieces from the original vehicle and the extra parts vehicle.

      • Posted 2013/03/11 at 12:20 PM | Permalink

        To be fair, even from the same manufacturer or same tin, the paint can often be a different shade to that on the vehicle because it fades with age. Land Rovers seem to suffer from this more than most and I’ve had a nightmare trying to colour match before. In the end I gave up and painted my wifes 109″ in marine blue and my own 88″ in a custom mixed cockpit green. I know I’ll have to get a special mix made up if I ever need to do any touch ups on the 88″ but in reality the supposedly std marine blue is not quite the same shade as the marine blue on other panels that I’ve bought 2nd so would probably still need a custom mix to match in future.

        Red should look good and is more unsual these days too as most Land Rovers seem to be either some shade of green or the more modern ones have metallic paint.


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